Dr John Sullivan

Dr John Sullivan is an internationally known HR thought-leader from the Silicon Valley who specializes in providing bold and high business impact; strategic Talent Management solutions to large corporations.

Finding the Best in Your Field

Identifying the best in a functional field is easier than you think. If you are targeting the very best in a field to recruit expect them NOT to be active job seekers. Also assume you are going to have to build a long term ‘relationship’ with them in order to …

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Post-Exit Interviews – More useful than exit interviews

Expect to find a significant difference in the answers you get from post-exit interviews/questionnaires (as opposed to traditional exit interviews) because: Individuals are less emotional 6 months later.They have had time to reflect and compare “us”to their new situation.And they no longer have the need for a “good”reference from their …

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DEVELOPING A LEARNING NETWORK (HOW YOUR VP GETS SO SMART)

How do leading Vice Presidents of Human Resources get “so smart”? As the head of HR at San Francisco State University, I am privileged to get to meet the best VPs from the best Silicon Valley high tech firms. Two years ago, we began a program focused on identifying “Why do …

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Stop doing job descriptions – an irreverent look at job descriptions

No, everyone doesn't use Job Description (JD's). I know several hi-tech firms that don't have them and are proud of it. Now they do have "thought up on the run" one paragraph recruitment postings but, these show no measurable-- irreverent look at job descriptions--correlation to the final hiring criteria, which by "Hi-tech law" (at least in the Silicon Valley) MUST be made up during the interview process. (apologies in advance to the three-letter computer company that let me in on the "secret ") :-)

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HR Program Evaluation Template – 360° Feedback

Increased feedback and multi-source feedback results in a change in management behavior and an increase in performance. Theoretically, anonymous feedback is more open and honest then one-on-one feedback. The assumption is that honest feedback changes management behavior faster than restricted feedback.

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