How to Hire After Layoffs By Lauren Dixon

As seen on Reworked.co by Lauren Dixon

How to Hire Again

When it does come time to hire for a previously eliminated role, legal questions are the first to address.

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) suggests to wait at least six months since the layoff. If “the former employee finds out the new hire or replacement is younger than him or herself (age 40 or under), of a different race, religion, gender, less qualified, etc. it may cast doubt on the legitimacy of the position elimination in the first place,” and open the organization up to accusations of unlawful termination, the organization advised

One solution could be to rehire a previously laid off employee. John Sullivan, professor at San Francisco State University and corporate speaker and advisor, advised that some of the former staff will want to come back. These workers are called “boomerang talent.”

One method for finding boomerang talent that Sullivan shared involves a talent community of former employees. Every month, the organization can send a newsletter to keep former staff informed. As the organization improves its finances and appears more stable, it grows more attractive to work for again. 

Sullivan added that the organization can survey its best employees to ask them for ideas of perks to entice boomerang talent, highlighting those in the newsletter. “After a few months of newsletters, they might come back.”

Promote Your Brand via Messages of Stability

In the end, hiring is “just like sales. You counter their arguments, you add a few wows,” and highlight the benefits, Sullivan added.

Read the full article by Lauren Dixon here.

About Dr John Sullivan

Dr John Sullivan is an internationally known HR thought-leader from the Silicon Valley who specializes in providing bold and high business impact; strategic Talent Management solutions to large corporations.

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